Gender in research

Recognizing, and giving due consideration to, gender-specific differences between men and women is of crucial importance in medical research.
More research is necessary into the differences between the genders in relation to diagnosis, treatment and outcomes.
The Institute of Gender in Medicine, which is unique in Germany, produces research that helps improve the treatment of patients from both genders.

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Institute of Gender in Medicine

At Charité, the Institute of Gender in Medicine (GIM) works in close cooperation with the Office for Women's Affairs and Equal Opportunities.
Initially founded as an interdisciplinary research center in 2003, the GIM became an independent institute in 2007.

Guidelines: Implementing Gender Equality (Leitfaden: Umsetzung von Gleichstellung)

Gender equality – German Research Foundation (DFG)

In both science and research, gender equality is becoming increasingly significant; this is aptly illustrated by the German Research Foundation's (DFG) research-oriented standards for gender equality in research, and their focus on incorporating gender and equality perspectives into the approval process for funding awards. Please visit the DFG site for additional information. The DFG pages also provide access to the 'DFG-Toolbox', an online repository of real-life examples of gender equality and equal opportunity measures (Berichte im Rahmen der Forschungsorientierten Gleichstellungsstandards der DFG, 2011 [DFG Reports on research-oriented gender equality standards, 2011]).

Equal opportunities in EU research

Research by women – research for women – research on women

The European Union is committed to promoting equal opportunities for women in research. In 2012, gender equality became one of the five priority areas guiding the EU's strategic engagement in developing the European research area. The subject of gender equality and gender mainstreaming (the integration of gender perspectives) in research gained both the recognition it deserves and the level of attention that is required in order to achieve greater participation of women in research.